4DB Primitive Haversack Dump

4DB Primitive Haversack Dump

This is my handmade primitive leather haversack that gifted to me by my good friend Mike Parker at:
https://www.facebook.com/mike.parker.3517

I keep this primitive kit with me in my vehicle all the time. In this video I spontaneously dump it out because I was inspired by my hand drill friction fire on this day to go through my kit. It has been 8 long months since my right hand was seriously injured and I’ve been unable to to any primitive skills. I was successful with the hand drill which was nice but I did pay the price with a big blister just below my scar. In my primitive kit I have everything from deer bones to sinew, pine pitch to natural cordage willow bark. I show how I processed my deer hide and sinew and also how I spall my obsidian for use in making primitive arrows. All these items are great for survival, bushcrafting and self reliance. It is great to learn the skills of our ancestors.

Thank you very much for watching, subscribing, sharing and liking our channel. Please stay tuned in for many more great videos.

Below is all of our social media links, some Amazon links and 4DB website product links.

4DB Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB Facebook Group at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB Website blog at: https://4directionsbushcraft.com/blog/

4DB newsletter registration: http://4directionsbushcraft.us13.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=45c5a502686fc44211df4d689&id=431382b638

4DB Amazon product link:
https://www.amazon.com/Ferrocerium-Starting-Paracord-Camouflage-Carabiner/dp/B01N5TYLC2/ref=pd_rhf_se_p_img_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=DM06ZJ5ANXM5QWRBZB9K

4DB Elite Ferro rods on Amazon at:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06WJ5FG4K/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=4dbweb1-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B06WJ5FG4K&linkId=b35a2e477853cd9deaaa4b91f188fd68

4DB T-shirts on Amazon
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XFC7BXK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1488680466&sr=8-1&keywords=4db+tshirts

4DB Tactical Rucksacks at:
https://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/tactical-rucksacks-30l/

4DB HSS Osage Orange Strikers at:
https://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/4db-striker/

4DB Huge 5″x1/2″ Ferro Rods at:
https://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/huge-ferro-rods/

4DB Elite Ferro Rods at:
https://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/4db-elite-ferrocerium-rod-7-79-x-12/

The Art of Primitive Survival Skills

The Art of Primitive Survival Skills


In this collaboration video I use clips from all of our primitive skills videos found throughout our YouTube channel. These are skills that we feel are essential for survival in the wilderness. We had fun showing many of the unique skills by slowing and speeding up the film. This allows us to pack many videos and primitive survival skills into one. We have organized this video into fire, fire cooking, primitive clay pottery, firing clay pottery, primitive bushcraft shelters, primitive survival traps, primitive axes and tools. We hope you enjoy!!

Thank you very much for watching, subscribing, sharing and liking our channel. Please stay tuned in for many more great videos. Below is all of our social media links, some Amazon links and 4DB website product links.

4DB Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB Facebook Group at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB Website blog at: https://4directionsbushcraft.com/blog/

4DB newsletter registration: http://4directionsbushcraft.us13.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=45c5a502686fc44211df4d689&id=431382b638

4DB Amazon product link:
https://www.amazon.com/Ferrocerium-Starting-Paracord-Camouflage-Carabiner/dp/B01N5TYLC2/ref=pd_rhf_se_p_img_2?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=DM06ZJ5ANXM5QWRBZB9K

4DB Elite Ferro rods on Amazon at:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06WJ5FG4K/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=4dbweb1-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B06WJ5FG4K&linkId=b35a2e477853cd9deaaa4b91f188fd68

4DB T-shirts on Amazon
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XFC7BXK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1488680466&sr=8-1&keywords=4db+tshirts

4DB Tactical Rucksacks at:
https://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/tactical-rucksacks-30l/

4DB HSS Osage Orange Strikers at:
https://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/4db-striker/

Hafting a Stone Ground Axe, Deep Woods Brush Shelter, Bow Drill Submerged in Water

Hafting a Stone Ground Axe, Deep Woods Brush Shelter, Bow Drill Submerged in Water

Thank you all for watching. In this video I haft the full groove stone ground axe head that I have been working on. I start with birch tar glue and cow raw hide. I use the plummet to flatten a piece of the hide and place it on the white tail deer antler to fill in the voids so hafting wouldimg_2890 be easier. I wrap cow raw hide through the groove on the axe head. This will fill voids and when it dries it secures the axe head as well. I then wrap the axe head and antler with artificial sinew. This must be as tight as I can possibly make it. Real sinew is recommended due to it’s natural strength and glue characteristics. I secure it with birch tare glue. I then wrap natural cordage white willow bark around it and I also secure that with birch tar glue. I repeatedly reheat the entire axe over the hot camp fire coals and press the birch tar glue into the bindings of the sinew and willow bark. This will make it like they are bonded together and stronger when it dries. The last step in hafting I wrap natural cordage Basswood inner bark (this was made off camera to save time) around the axe for more stability and to make it look a little better. I secure this with birch tar glue as well.img_2809
I had to wait a few days for the raw hide to dry and the birch tar to set. I then wanted to put it to the test and I did this by building a deep woods brush shelter. I chopped a tree using a beaver chew technique, I wanted the tree to still be attached to that it would create the header for my shelter. The axe held strong and performed well. I finished the shelter off with Japanese Honeysuckle branches which I also cut down with the axe. I finish the shelter off with a fern bed which made it very comfortable. I wanted a fire and started it with a soaking wet bow drill set that I submerged into water a couple of times. This bow drill set is Basswood and can be purchased on my website using this link img_2617https://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/bow-drill-friction-fire-kit/
This took two tries to accomplish a coal and my spindle was binding up due to the wood being wet. With a little patience I did pull it off on the second try and I was able to boil some water in my primitive clay cup that I made last year. This was a nice treat while I enjoyed the shade that my brush shelter provided.
The hafting process took a total of 4 days while the stone ground axe head took approximately 2 days. Hafting is an art all in itself and is usually done several times during an axes life time. It requires a lot of patience due to the processes that must be done to ensure strength, like birch tar and natural cordage.
This is how our ancestors would have completed a project like this. They used the same techniques but without some of the resources like the tin can and pliers.
Thank you and have fun out there. Please subscribe, like and share and we will see you on the next video.
Check out the links below to follow 4DB

4DB Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB Blog at: https://4directionsbushcraft.com/blog/

4DB News letter Registration at: http://4directionsbushcraft.us13.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=45c5a502686fc44211df4d689&id=431382b638

4DB Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/4directionsbushcraft/

~ Chris

4DB

Tar glue, Stone boiling, Staining and Preparing to Haft a Stone Ground Axe

Tar glue, Stone boiling, Staining and Preparing to Haft a Stone Ground Axe

https://youtu.be/yX6Ax1gJpOg

In this video I start by reducing birch bark into Birch Bark oil. This takes about 1 1/2. I then further reduce it down into tar so it can be utilized as a glue for hafting. I use Black Walnut husk and separate them from their seeds with a replica Stone Age Plummet that I stone ground in the sameimg_2777  way as the full groove axe head I am getting ready to haft. The Plummet is a very useful tool and would have been used in the Paleolithic and Neolithic Stone Age in much of the same way as I used it here. When removing the walnut husks they will stain your hands and arms if they splash up on your skin. I suggest wearing protective clothing that you don’t mind getting stained. These will stain anything they come in contact with.
I then place a piece of White Tail Deer antler in a natural container made in the creek bottom by water run off. This is filled with rain water from the recent rains we received in my area. I place the walnut husks in along with the antler and hot stones that I placed in the fire. You must be careful with this step as they do explode if left in the fire to long. In this case I heat them up for about 20 minutes or so. This is long enough to get them hot but not make them explode. Most of the rocks I use are right from the creek and are wet. They do work for stone boiling but I do not recommend using them.
After about 1 1/2 hours rotating the rocks in and out of the water I pull the antler out to find it nicely stained brown by the walnut husks.
I then further reduce the Birch oil down into a thick tar by placing it over the fire and then cooling it in the water and repeating. Using this technique I can easily judge the rate in which the tar is reducing. If the tar reduces to quickly it can turn into a useless carbon. This step img_2809takes a lot of patients. When the oil it thick enough I poor it out onto a piece of Birch Bark and add ash to it. This allows it to bond, harden and not stick to other objects until I reheat it for use.
In my last video https://youtu.be/P86WocTyNxo
I make natural cordage out of White Willow bark in preparation to haft my full groove stone ground axe head.
As you can see hafting is a very long process and can take more time than making the actual tool itself. If done right it will have the strength to withstand chopping.
Stay tuned for my next video on the actual hafting of the axe head to the deer antler.
We thank you all very much for your views, comments and support.
Please subscribe, like and share and we will have plenty more videos like this one.
Be sure to look at our other social media links below and our website where we sell fantastic bushcraft, survival and prepping gear at low prices.

4DB Website at: https://4directionsbushcraft.com/

4DB Blog at: https://4directionsbushcraft.com/blog/

4DB News letter registration at: http://4directionsbushcraft.us13.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=45c5a502686fc44211df4d689&id=431382b638

4DB Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/4directionsbushcraft/

~ Chris

4DB

The Study of Primitive Skills

The Study of Primitive Skills

I am very interested in the unique skills of our ancestors and I love to revisit the methods they used in order to adapt to their environment. I stone-toolsstudy the Paleolithic and Neolithic Stone Age along with our Native American time periods to try and grasp their techniques and way of life. I am currently working on a series of YouTube videos that demonstrates a few of these ancient techniques.

Neolithic Ground Stone Axe

Ground Stone axe heads, natural cordage, hafting and friction fire methods that our ancestors used in their day to day life styles. I use only the resources and techniques that they would have used in order to replicate and experience their struggles to make life more comfortable. Be sure to to tune in and subscribe to our YouTube middle-stone-age-picchannel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUsld9DrfRRNVgZODfEKmgg so that you can also see a few of the methods our ancestors used. Our next video will cover the difficult process of hafting a stone ground axe head. Thank you.

~Chris

4DB