Primitive Survival Shelter | No Tools | Raised Platform Bed

In this video we make a primitive survival shelter that is a raised bed with no tools or cordage. The bed is approximately 4 feet off the ground and would be great for wet weather conditions. We start in a cedar thick woodland where we can utilize dead cedar trees. The trees are easy to work with because they are close together with lots of branches to stack other trees against. This type of bio-region is perfect for building bushcraft shelters. We layer the platform with loose cross sticks allowing us to sit and lay comfortably. we use hand drill friction fire to start a fire. We lay the fire on a rock layered with clay found from the creek nearby. This allows us to have a fire up on the platform bed with us. This primitive survival shelter only took one hour to complete and would be ideal for one to two nights. With a lean-to of green branches behind it it will protect us from the sun.

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Building a Native American Sweat Lodge

In this video we are all building a Native American Sweat Lodge to sit in. We start by collecting Willow trees that will bend and keep they’re strength. We simply make 6 holes and bury the thick end of the willow trees into the holes. We then bend the willow slowly and tie them together. After all 6 trees are in and we have a dome type shelter we put 2 outer rims on by using smaller willow trees. These outer rims will act as additional support for the sweat lodge its self and for all the blankets and tarps we will put on it. We place a heavy duty canvas tarp on the outside. This will keep the lodge dry and the heat from the rocks in. We dig a hole in the center of the lodge for the hot rocks (grandfathers). The Native American sweat lodge has been used by our earliest ancestors. They used animal hides to cover their lodges and they used the lodge to pray to the spirits of all four directions, father sky and mother earth. In this way they could purify themselves and ask the spirits for help, health and happiness.

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Primitive Skills: Shelter Building | NO TOOLS

In this video I show many different primitive technology skills to build a simple overnight shelter without the use of cordage or a knife. I simply use dead standing wood that can easily be broken using different leverage techniques. I use Muscadine grape vine to secure the tripod together so it will support the weight. Instead of using an and out weave to tie the tripod together I simply turn the middle tripod pole the opposite direction which binds it together. I use green brush for cover on the shelter. The shelter is built around a previous snake hole fire pit which allows my fire to stay out of the elements. To start my fire I use a handrill friction fire with yucca stalk, basswood hearth and cedar bark tinder. I keep the stones in the fire while I finish my shelter for about 45 minutes or so. I allow the fire to die down so I can access the stones. I procure water in a natural stone bowl using a stone boil method. You must use caution when putting stones in a fire, if they are wet they may explode and cause injury. Although the water is a little dirty it will be good to drink. It does have a little coal in the water from the stones which is good in that it will help neutralize toxins. When the water cools and most of the silt has settled at the bottom I can then drink. If I wanted I could flavor the water with pine needles or cedar as well. These would also offer nutrients such as vitamin C. I practice skills all over but here in the eastern woodlands we have many resources that can be utilized in order to thrive in nature. The shelter, water, fire and natural container supplying water only took me approximately 2 hours to acquire. If this were a survival type situation I would have plenty of time to find food as well. The raspberry close to the creek would supply a good food source but the berries have not grown yet. Remember the wild raspberry has a chalky stalk with a 3 fingered leave and plenty of thorns. Also do not eat wild foods before doing the proper research on them.

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Hafting a Stone Ground Axe, Deep Woods Brush Shelter, Bow Drill Submerged in Water

Thank you all for watching. In this video I haft the full groove stone ground axe head that I have been working on. I start with birch tar glue and cow raw hide. I use the plummet to flatten a piece of the hide and place it on the white tail deer antler to fill in the voids so hafting wouldimg_2890 be easier. I wrap cow raw hide through the groove on the axe head. This will fill voids and when it dries it secures the axe head as well. I then wrap the axe head and antler with artificial sinew. This must be as tight as I can possibly make it. Real sinew is recommended due to it’s natural strength and glue characteristics. I secure it with birch tare glue. I then wrap natural cordage white willow bark around it and I also secure that with birch tar glue. I repeatedly reheat the entire axe over the hot camp fire coals and press the birch tar glue into the bindings of the sinew and willow bark. This will make it like they are bonded together and stronger when it dries. The last step in hafting I wrap natural cordage Basswood inner bark (this was made off camera to save time) around the axe for more stability and to make it look a little better. I secure this with birch tar glue as well.img_2809
I had to wait a few days for the raw hide to dry and the birch tar to set. I then wanted to put it to the test and I did this by building a deep woods brush shelter. I chopped a tree using a beaver chew technique, I wanted the tree to still be attached to that it would create the header for my shelter. The axe held strong and performed well. I finished the shelter off with Japanese Honeysuckle branches which I also cut down with the axe. I finish the shelter off with a fern bed which made it very comfortable. I wanted a fire and started it with a soaking wet bow drill set that I submerged into water a couple of times. This bow drill set is Basswood and can be purchased on my website using this link img_2617https://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/bow-drill-friction-fire-kit/
This took two tries to accomplish a coal and my spindle was binding up due to the wood being wet. With a little patience I did pull it off on the second try and I was able to boil some water in my primitive clay cup that I made last year. This was a nice treat while I enjoyed the shade that my brush shelter provided.
The hafting process took a total of 4 days while the stone ground axe head took approximately 2 days. Hafting is an art all in itself and is usually done several times during an axes life time. It requires a lot of patience due to the processes that must be done to ensure strength, like birch tar and natural cordage.
This is how our ancestors would have completed a project like this. They used the same techniques but without some of the resources like the tin can and pliers.
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