Primitive Skills Day Hike with Natural Shelter, Food and Water Procurement

Primitive Skills Day Hike with Natural Shelter, Food and Water Procurement

In this video I take a day out and practice my primitive skills with gathering wild edibles such as Sassafras, Wood Sorrel and Greenbrier to name a few. I make a primitive minnow trap and capture a crawdad. These would be able to feed me if I was in a survival situation. I also find a all natural shelter within a rock overhang and a downed tree. This type of shelter did not take any time or energy to make and would keep me dry, warm and out of the wind. I was able to make a friction fire with a hand drill set and would then be able to procure water and cook food. The hand drill is Yucca stalk and basswood hearth board. For a container I boil water in an all natural container. Making a container with all natural resources is difficult and takes a lot of time. If you can find a natural container and stone boil in it that will save you time and energy. This method works when you have a smaller natural container. If your container is to large it will be harder to bring the water to a full boil. Within the Eastern woodlands there are many resource you can utilize if you know what your looking for. Even though I do bring my pack on long hikes like this I love to practice my primitive skills and use nothing out of my pack, this not only keeps me humble but allows me the confidence to know I can survive and thrive in the woods with nothing but my clothes on my back.

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Finding Good Clay, Primitive Pottery and Dakota Fire

Finding Good Clay, Primitive Pottery and Dakota Fire

Welcome to another video my friends. This is a video that was requested by two people, and I always have fun playing with clay. I show where a good spot to look for clay would be. River banks, creek run off, lakes and streams also. The good clay will be found at the bottom and along the banks. You will some times have to dig down for good clay. In this case I have a lot of clay that has settled at the bottom of a creek bed in my town. It is almost pure quality as nature has filtered the clay for me. We still have to pick some of the rocks out of it but it is pretty clean. If you have to dig your clay up you will have to filter it out more and purify it more. When doing this I also dry the clay of excess water by hanging it outside in an old sheet.
But here we just want to make it primitive and use what nature provides. I form a small bowl and add temper to it as well. I use fibrous Cedar bark and Muscadine vine for this and it seems to work well in keeping the clay together and not cracking as much. When making primitive pottery you always want to make a few if possible because it is very common to loose some through breaking and cracking.
I then dig two holes and combine them beneath the service, creating my Dakota fire pit. One hole is bigger and will be used for the fire the other is for ventilation. You can do this also by digging a trench and placing a rock in the middle creating a bridge.
The advantage of using a Dakota Fire pit is that it is stealthy, efficient, makes cooking easy and easy clean up. It creates less smoke and can be covered in with dirt easy after use. You can put green sticks over it to cook on and create a grill. It also burns hot and efficient due to the natural ventilation of the second hole.
As my fire is building up a good coal base I dry my clay next to it, slowly rotating it so it does not dry to fast. If it dries to fast it will crack. When the outside layer is dry I place my clay bowl in the fire on the base of the coals. I build my fire back up around it and burn it hot for approximately an hour. I then let it burn down and cover the whole thing with sand to let it cool naturally. If I were to just take the clay out of the fire and let it cool it will crack due to cooling to fast. I will come back in approximately 24 hours to check and see if my clay survived or not.
Working with primitive clay like this takes lots of patience but it is always fun to practice these skills. I hope you enjoyed this video. Be sure to subscribe and follow us on our social media links below.

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4DB

Full Groove Stone Ground Axe with Willow Bark Cordage

Full Groove Stone Ground Axe with Willow Bark Cordage

https://youtu.be/P86WocTyNxo

In this video I demonstrate the very long process of creating a full groove stone ground Neolithic (New Stone Age) axe head. During this video I work on two different axe head projects but the process is the same and consists of pecking the stone and grinding the stone. This particular project took about 12-16 hours just in forming the axe head itself.
I’m preparing to haft the axe so I create natural cordage with white willow bark to help with this. I processes the bark down then boil it in camp fire char coal and ash to make it even more pliable. This will help it not to break during the chopping with the axe.
I also create fire with a Yucca spindle and White Pine hearth board.
I roast and eat a Cattail root. I also eat a piece of steak for lunch with the dogs.
The only other process in recreating a Neolithic Stone Ground Axe is to haft the axe. I will demonstrate this in my next video so please stay tuned in.
I appreciate all of you that have come along with me in this journey back in time. This type of project allows us to see and experience the type of life style our ancestors had and how hard they had to work to produce tools and weapons.
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4DB Meets Mike Parker Bows Primitive Gear and Friction Fire Weekend

4DB Meets Mike Parker Bows Primitive Gear and Friction Fire Weekend

This is a lot of raw video footage from me and Mike Parker from Mike Parker Bows https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH2qawGYfuN-zSN5LhYc-Cw
during Labor Day weekend. We were able to put in a lot of dirt time and some primitive skills. We demonstrate the hand drill, bow drill and fire saw friction fire methods. Also Mike explains and shows off some of his unique primitive tools and gear that he has made himself. Mike also hand made an authentic Native American Osage Orange short bow for my son and teaches him how to shoot it properly. Mikes hand made bows are supreme and made with precise precision. This short bow was backed with snake skin and not only making the bow stronger it added a unique and beautiful touch to it. I would suggest to all of you watching this video to order yourself a Mike Parker Bow you can not go wrong.

You can reach him via facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Mike-Parker-Bows-412531425621294/?fref=ts

Thank you all for watching and have fun out there. Be sure to subscribe, like and comment.

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~Chris

4 Directions Bushcraft

New Primitive Video up on YouTube at 4DB

Check out our new video on YouTube, Neolithic Ground Stone Hand Axe.

In this video I make a Neolithic (New Stone Age) polished hand axe. These tools were made by the earliest humans to help them process foods, wood and construct more tools. This period of time was 10,200 BC and was the last part of the Stone Age when farming began. It ended when metal tools, such as Copper and Bronze, became widespread. Many Neolithic Stone tools were polished and ground down by another stone to be formed as I demonstrate in this video. By using this technique the tool becomes very durable and requires less maintenance than chipped or flaked stone. Typically the types of stone used are granite, basalt, rhyolite and other igneous and cryptocrystalline rocks. This is a piece of basalt stone. As you can see these tools were very effective for the time period.

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