Primitive Skills Day Hike with Natural Shelter, Food and Water Procurement

Primitive Skills Day Hike with Natural Shelter, Food and Water Procurement

In this video I take a day out and practice my primitive skills with gathering wild edibles such as Sassafras, Wood Sorrel and Greenbrier to name a few. I make a primitive minnow trap and capture a crawdad. These would be able to feed me if I was in a survival situation. I also find a all natural shelter within a rock overhang and a downed tree. This type of shelter did not take any time or energy to make and would keep me dry, warm and out of the wind. I was able to make a friction fire with a hand drill set and would then be able to procure water and cook food. The hand drill is Yucca stalk and basswood hearth board. For a container I boil water in an all natural container. Making a container with all natural resources is difficult and takes a lot of time. If you can find a natural container and stone boil in it that will save you time and energy. This method works when you have a smaller natural container. If your container is to large it will be harder to bring the water to a full boil. Within the Eastern woodlands there are many resource you can utilize if you know what your looking for. Even though I do bring my pack on long hikes like this I love to practice my primitive skills and use nothing out of my pack, this not only keeps me humble but allows me the confidence to know I can survive and thrive in the woods with nothing but my clothes on my back.

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4DB Facebook Group GAW Winner!

4DB Facebook Group GAW Winner!

Congratulations Jeremiah Johnson!! You my friend have won!! Please send us a message via Facebook our our email below within 24 hours to claim your prize. If Jeremiah does not contact us within the 24 hours Eduardo will win.
This is a Giveaway video that we did exclusively for the members of the 4DB Facebook group. We encourage all of you to join using the link below if you haven’t already. We will be doing many more giveaways in the future including one for our 3000 YT subscribers.
In this GAW we are giving away a Mike Parker Bow Drill set, 4DB Fatwood Ferro Rod, 2x Blank 4DB Ferro rods, 4DB Ink Pens.
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4DB Facebook Group Giveaway

4DB Facebook Group Giveaway

This video is a introduction to our new Facebook Group at:
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And a giveaway of the following items:
-two 4DB blank 5″x1/2″ ferro rods
-one 4DB Fatwood Handle Ferro Rod
-one Mike Parker and 4DB Bow Drill Friction Fire Kit.

The rules to the giveaway are as follows:
-winner must pay shipping if outside the US only.
-You must join our Facebook group with link above.
-You must post a outdoors type picture like your last hike for example.
The winner will be drawn from our list of members after a two week period via a 4DB YouTube video.
Good luck and go join our laid back survival/bushcraft group.

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Also order a custom made kydex sheath
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We will no longer be offering the NC Fatwood due to complications.
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One Handed Bow Drill Friction Fire

One Handed Bow Drill Friction Fire

In this video I demonstrate a one handed bow drill friction fire. I do this by using the downward weight of a large old log that I had by my camp. I carve a divot in one end of the log so I can use it to house my spindle and act as a bearing block. If I carve down far enough into the dead wood it still has great wood that is useful. I then flip the log over and stabilize it with two pointed wood stakes and two logs that I lay across it. This along with the two large trees I utilize make the log very sturdy and will not move back and forth. I then carve a new divot in my basswood bow drill hearth board and I get ready to burn it in and prepare for my coal. I do this by placing it on the ground and turning my knife in a circle. This is the safest way to do this with one hand and two hand alike. I then place my basswood spindle under my right arm and carve one end sharp and the other blunt. Basswood is a superior wood to use for both friction fire and carving due to it’s very soft nature. I also use my right forearm and right leg to carve but this is dangerous and I’m not right handed so my left hand is a little uncoordinated. I carefully place my spindle in the tarred bank line bow I made. I do this using my forearms. I then prop up the log and place the spindle in the log bearing block divot I also use my right forearm to complete this task. I allow the hearth board to seat into the dirt under the weight of the log. I then begin to burn in the hearth board. I notice the weight of the log is to heavy so I relieve some of the weight with my right forearm. As the burn in comes to completion I allow more of the weight to come down on the hearth board this creates more of a burn in. I then carve my notch in the hearth board also by placing it on the ground and stepping on it with my left foot. Again using my left hand to carve this out is very unstable and takes a great deal of effort. I then repeat the same actions as above and a go for the coal. I failed this a total of 4 times and on my 5th time I succeed. The reason I failed is a combination of unstable hearth board and the bowing action of the bow. When using this method both must be absolutely secure and balanced. I finally get a coal and blow it into flame. This is one of the hardest challenges I’ve had to face with my survival skills. One handed skills are extremely important to learn and practice, you never know when your going to need them. If I was hurt out in the wild It would be extremely hard to coop with the injury and apply survival techniques at the same time. I thank every one of you who watch and support me. Thank you also for all of the get well wishes, comments and subscriptions. You have fun out there and we will see you on the next video.

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Finding Good Clay, Primitive Pottery and Dakota Fire

Finding Good Clay, Primitive Pottery and Dakota Fire

Welcome to another video my friends. This is a video that was requested by two people, and I always have fun playing with clay. I show where a good spot to look for clay would be. River banks, creek run off, lakes and streams also. The good clay will be found at the bottom and along the banks. You will some times have to dig down for good clay. In this case I have a lot of clay that has settled at the bottom of a creek bed in my town. It is almost pure quality as nature has filtered the clay for me. We still have to pick some of the rocks out of it but it is pretty clean. If you have to dig your clay up you will have to filter it out more and purify it more. When doing this I also dry the clay of excess water by hanging it outside in an old sheet.
But here we just want to make it primitive and use what nature provides. I form a small bowl and add temper to it as well. I use fibrous Cedar bark and Muscadine vine for this and it seems to work well in keeping the clay together and not cracking as much. When making primitive pottery you always want to make a few if possible because it is very common to loose some through breaking and cracking.
I then dig two holes and combine them beneath the service, creating my Dakota fire pit. One hole is bigger and will be used for the fire the other is for ventilation. You can do this also by digging a trench and placing a rock in the middle creating a bridge.
The advantage of using a Dakota Fire pit is that it is stealthy, efficient, makes cooking easy and easy clean up. It creates less smoke and can be covered in with dirt easy after use. You can put green sticks over it to cook on and create a grill. It also burns hot and efficient due to the natural ventilation of the second hole.
As my fire is building up a good coal base I dry my clay next to it, slowly rotating it so it does not dry to fast. If it dries to fast it will crack. When the outside layer is dry I place my clay bowl in the fire on the base of the coals. I build my fire back up around it and burn it hot for approximately an hour. I then let it burn down and cover the whole thing with sand to let it cool naturally. If I were to just take the clay out of the fire and let it cool it will crack due to cooling to fast. I will come back in approximately 24 hours to check and see if my clay survived or not.
Working with primitive clay like this takes lots of patience but it is always fun to practice these skills. I hope you enjoyed this video. Be sure to subscribe and follow us on our social media links below.

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~ Chris

4DB