4DB New Product, Expo News and Thanks

4DB New Product, Expo News and Thanks

We are very pleased to joining the Bullseye Prepardness & Outdoor Expo next year 2017 June 10-11 in Pigeon Forge, TN
at the LeConte Center

https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=bullseye%20preparedness%20and%20outdoors%20expo
You have fun out there and we will see you on the next video.

Come and join us! We will have all of our product out and fire demos as well.
Thank you to Kevin Murphy for all of your help and allowing us this great opportunity.
4DB will also be carrying the Giant/Monster Ferro Rods 5″x1″ from Nathan4071
http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=nathan4071%20monster%20ferro%20rod&ssPageName=GSTL

Thank you Nathan4071 for allowing us to carry your product.
These ferro rods are equal to four of the 5″x1/2″ ferro rods and are easy to use, which Brandon demonstrates in the video. They throw gobs of hot sparks and will last a lifetime.

Thank you all for the get well wishes for my hand injury! It really helps to have so many great supporters/subscribers out there.

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One Handed Bow Drill Friction Fire

One Handed Bow Drill Friction Fire

In this video I demonstrate a one handed bow drill friction fire. I do this by using the downward weight of a large old log that I had by my camp. I carve a divot in one end of the log so I can use it to house my spindle and act as a bearing block. If I carve down far enough into the dead wood it still has great wood that is useful. I then flip the log over and stabilize it with two pointed wood stakes and two logs that I lay across it. This along with the two large trees I utilize make the log very sturdy and will not move back and forth. I then carve a new divot in my basswood bow drill hearth board and I get ready to burn it in and prepare for my coal. I do this by placing it on the ground and turning my knife in a circle. This is the safest way to do this with one hand and two hand alike. I then place my basswood spindle under my right arm and carve one end sharp and the other blunt. Basswood is a superior wood to use for both friction fire and carving due to it’s very soft nature. I also use my right forearm and right leg to carve but this is dangerous and I’m not right handed so my left hand is a little uncoordinated. I carefully place my spindle in the tarred bank line bow I made. I do this using my forearms. I then prop up the log and place the spindle in the log bearing block divot I also use my right forearm to complete this task. I allow the hearth board to seat into the dirt under the weight of the log. I then begin to burn in the hearth board. I notice the weight of the log is to heavy so I relieve some of the weight with my right forearm. As the burn in comes to completion I allow more of the weight to come down on the hearth board this creates more of a burn in. I then carve my notch in the hearth board also by placing it on the ground and stepping on it with my left foot. Again using my left hand to carve this out is very unstable and takes a great deal of effort. I then repeat the same actions as above and a go for the coal. I failed this a total of 4 times and on my 5th time I succeed. The reason I failed is a combination of unstable hearth board and the bowing action of the bow. When using this method both must be absolutely secure and balanced. I finally get a coal and blow it into flame. This is one of the hardest challenges I’ve had to face with my survival skills. One handed skills are extremely important to learn and practice, you never know when your going to need them. If I was hurt out in the wild It would be extremely hard to coop with the injury and apply survival techniques at the same time. I thank every one of you who watch and support me. Thank you also for all of the get well wishes, comments and subscriptions. You have fun out there and we will see you on the next video.

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One Handed Ferro Rod, Feather Stick and Pine Pitch Skills

One Handed Ferro Rod, Feather Stick and Pine Pitch Skills

In this video I show just how important it can be to learn survival skills using both hands. I recently severed both tendons in my right (dominant) hand and now I am not allowed to use it for three months. I can either stay at home or learn to use my left hand for my bushcrafting skills, you know which one I chose!
I use my left hand to start a ferro rod fire using cedar bark, river birch and corn husk silk. I found creating a better than normal tinder bundle is essential for this technique. I make a left handed feather stick after the fire is started just to see how well I can manage it, I think it came out okay. I needed some pine pitch to restock my supply so I wanted to make some more. This is all much more difficult with your none dominant hand I found. It is always important to learn essential skills with you other hand so you can do it when needed. I urge you to try these but be very careful as always.
Thank you for watching, your support, comments and subscribing to our channel.
Please share, like and visit our website above to check out our handcrafted bushcraft and survival gear.
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Finding Good Clay, Primitive Pottery and Dakota Fire

Finding Good Clay, Primitive Pottery and Dakota Fire

Welcome to another video my friends. This is a video that was requested by two people, and I always have fun playing with clay. I show where a good spot to look for clay would be. River banks, creek run off, lakes and streams also. The good clay will be found at the bottom and along the banks. You will some times have to dig down for good clay. In this case I have a lot of clay that has settled at the bottom of a creek bed in my town. It is almost pure quality as nature has filtered the clay for me. We still have to pick some of the rocks out of it but it is pretty clean. If you have to dig your clay up you will have to filter it out more and purify it more. When doing this I also dry the clay of excess water by hanging it outside in an old sheet.
But here we just want to make it primitive and use what nature provides. I form a small bowl and add temper to it as well. I use fibrous Cedar bark and Muscadine vine for this and it seems to work well in keeping the clay together and not cracking as much. When making primitive pottery you always want to make a few if possible because it is very common to loose some through breaking and cracking.
I then dig two holes and combine them beneath the service, creating my Dakota fire pit. One hole is bigger and will be used for the fire the other is for ventilation. You can do this also by digging a trench and placing a rock in the middle creating a bridge.
The advantage of using a Dakota Fire pit is that it is stealthy, efficient, makes cooking easy and easy clean up. It creates less smoke and can be covered in with dirt easy after use. You can put green sticks over it to cook on and create a grill. It also burns hot and efficient due to the natural ventilation of the second hole.
As my fire is building up a good coal base I dry my clay next to it, slowly rotating it so it does not dry to fast. If it dries to fast it will crack. When the outside layer is dry I place my clay bowl in the fire on the base of the coals. I build my fire back up around it and burn it hot for approximately an hour. I then let it burn down and cover the whole thing with sand to let it cool naturally. If I were to just take the clay out of the fire and let it cool it will crack due to cooling to fast. I will come back in approximately 24 hours to check and see if my clay survived or not.
Working with primitive clay like this takes lots of patience but it is always fun to practice these skills. I hope you enjoyed this video. Be sure to subscribe and follow us on our social media links below.

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~ Chris

4DB

4DB Meets Mike Parker Bows Primitive Gear and Friction Fire Weekend

4DB Meets Mike Parker Bows Primitive Gear and Friction Fire Weekend

This is a lot of raw video footage from me and Mike Parker from Mike Parker Bows https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH2qawGYfuN-zSN5LhYc-Cw
during Labor Day weekend. We were able to put in a lot of dirt time and some primitive skills. We demonstrate the hand drill, bow drill and fire saw friction fire methods. Also Mike explains and shows off some of his unique primitive tools and gear that he has made himself. Mike also hand made an authentic Native American Osage Orange short bow for my son and teaches him how to shoot it properly. Mikes hand made bows are supreme and made with precise precision. This short bow was backed with snake skin and not only making the bow stronger it added a unique and beautiful touch to it. I would suggest to all of you watching this video to order yourself a Mike Parker Bow you can not go wrong.

You can reach him via facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Mike-Parker-Bows-412531425621294/?fref=ts

Thank you all for watching and have fun out there. Be sure to subscribe, like and comment.

4DB website at: http://4directionsbushcraft.com/
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~Chris

4 Directions Bushcraft