A Day in the Life of 4DB

A Day in the Life of 4DB


This a totally different video than what we have ever done and we filmed it to show all of our fans the day to day happenings around 4DB. We work really hard to bring all of our customers the very highest quality bushcraft and survival products as possible. We do this with a very minimal amount of space and equipment. We do all of our work by hand with almost no power tools.
I start off the day answering emails, comments and sharing in our social media sites which I have linked below. We film with our iphones and use home made tripods. I spend a lot of time on the phone throughout the day answering questions from our great customers. We believe this is an absolute necessity because our customers are the most important part of our business and deserve our time. We spend the rest of the day filling orders, making our products and running to the post office.
We do try to find the time to get out in the woods. This time we had to film some video and we made sure we got some AR shooting in at the same time!
We are very much family oriented and love our animals as well. I introduce you to our red fox lab named Gunny.
We are in the process of building our home on our land and I show you what will be our front yard. Our trappers cabin will have to be relocated. This land is very special to us because it is also where my wife and I were married.
I hope you enjoyed the vlog type video, showing you around the business and family here at 4DB.
We very much appreciate every one of your that watch our videos. Please like, share and subscribe.
Also be sure to connect with us on all of our social media links below.
We recently created a new 4 Directions Bushcraft Facebook group where everyone is welcome to go and share, teach, inspire and learn so we encourage you to visit and join with the link below. We occasionally do giveaways so you don’t want to miss those. We will be doing our next one when we reach 3,000 subscribers. Thank you!

4DB Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB Facebook Group at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB products on Amazon at: https://www.amazon.com/Ferrocerium-Starting-Paracord-Camouflage-Carabiner/dp/B01MRBAL2P/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1486924998&sr=8-3&keywords=5%22×1%2F2%22+ferro+rod+and+striker

4DB Website blog at: http://4directionsbushcraft.com/blog/

4DB newsletter registration: http://4directionsbushcraft.us13.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=45c5a502686fc44211df4d689&id=431382b638

4DB Ferro Rod and Striker – Designed for Ease of Use by Everyone

4DB Ferro Rod and Striker – Designed for Ease of Use by Everyone

In this video my wife Tawny demonstrates just how easy it is to make a fire using 4DB Ferro Rod and Striker matching Osage Orange handle set

Matching Osage Orange Ferro Rod & Striker


With this unique fire kit set up anyone can start a fire from the kiddos to elderly, handicap to the inexperienced woodsman or woods woman. The striker takes minimal downward pressure as Tawny demonstrates.
With the addition to the quality of our 5″x1/2″ ferro rods http://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/huge-ferro-rods/
and our all natural Fire Dust tinder

4DB Fire Dust


starting a sustainable and reliable fire has never been easier.
You have fun out there and we will see you on the next video.

Please look for our Black Friday Sale where our 5″x1/2″ ferro rods are only $9.50 ea. and our Osage Orange HSS Strikers will only be $19. both while supplies last. Sale will end at 12am on Saturday. Thank you.

If you would like to follow us on social media our links our below.

4DB Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB Website blog at: http://4directionsbushcraft.com/blog/

4DB newsletter registration: http://4directionsbushcraft.us13.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=45c5a502686fc44211df4d689&id=431382b638

4DB Fatwood and Thoughts on Store Bought Fatwood

4DB Fatwood and Thoughts on Store Bought Fatwood

In this video I examine the difference between my fatwood product that we offer at: http://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/1lbs-premium-fatwood/
and a big name store bought brand from Honduras. Now there is nothing wrong with a store bought fatwood that is not from the US but please watch out for people who resell this for double the price. Our product is harvested by us from our state of Missouri. We take a lot of pride in our product and we find and process only the very best and nothing less. Both of these products burn very well and seem to be the same quality. This is just a closer look at our quality and Honduras fatwood quality. What do you think? Thank you for watching, commenting and your support in a USA company and product.

Please follow us on social media our links our below.

4DB Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB Website blog at: http://4directionsbushcraft.com/blog/

4DB newsletter registration: http://4directionsbushcraft.us13.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=45c5a502686fc44211df4d689&id=431382b638

Hafting a Stone Ground Axe, Deep Woods Brush Shelter, Bow Drill Submerged in Water

Hafting a Stone Ground Axe, Deep Woods Brush Shelter, Bow Drill Submerged in Water

Thank you all for watching. In this video I haft the full groove stone ground axe head that I have been working on. I start with birch tar glue and cow raw hide. I use the plummet to flatten a piece of the hide and place it on the white tail deer antler to fill in the voids so hafting wouldimg_2890 be easier. I wrap cow raw hide through the groove on the axe head. This will fill voids and when it dries it secures the axe head as well. I then wrap the axe head and antler with artificial sinew. This must be as tight as I can possibly make it. Real sinew is recommended due to it’s natural strength and glue characteristics. I secure it with birch tare glue. I then wrap natural cordage white willow bark around it and I also secure that with birch tar glue. I repeatedly reheat the entire axe over the hot camp fire coals and press the birch tar glue into the bindings of the sinew and willow bark. This will make it like they are bonded together and stronger when it dries. The last step in hafting I wrap natural cordage Basswood inner bark (this was made off camera to save time) around the axe for more stability and to make it look a little better. I secure this with birch tar glue as well.img_2809
I had to wait a few days for the raw hide to dry and the birch tar to set. I then wanted to put it to the test and I did this by building a deep woods brush shelter. I chopped a tree using a beaver chew technique, I wanted the tree to still be attached to that it would create the header for my shelter. The axe held strong and performed well. I finished the shelter off with Japanese Honeysuckle branches which I also cut down with the axe. I finish the shelter off with a fern bed which made it very comfortable. I wanted a fire and started it with a soaking wet bow drill set that I submerged into water a couple of times. This bow drill set is Basswood and can be purchased on my website using this link img_2617http://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/bow-drill-friction-fire-kit/
This took two tries to accomplish a coal and my spindle was binding up due to the wood being wet. With a little patience I did pull it off on the second try and I was able to boil some water in my primitive clay cup that I made last year. This was a nice treat while I enjoyed the shade that my brush shelter provided.
The hafting process took a total of 4 days while the stone ground axe head took approximately 2 days. Hafting is an art all in itself and is usually done several times during an axes life time. It requires a lot of patience due to the processes that must be done to ensure strength, like birch tar and natural cordage.
This is how our ancestors would have completed a project like this. They used the same techniques but without some of the resources like the tin can and pliers.
Thank you and have fun out there. Please subscribe, like and share and we will see you on the next video.
Check out the links below to follow 4DB

4DB Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/4directionsbushcraft/

4DB Blog at: http://4directionsbushcraft.com/blog/

4DB News letter Registration at: http://4directionsbushcraft.us13.list-manage1.com/subscribe?u=45c5a502686fc44211df4d689&id=431382b638

4DB Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/4directionsbushcraft/

~ Chris

4DB

Pine Lighter or Fatwood and its Volatile State

As an avid Pine Lighter or Fatwood connoisseur of sorts it is no secrete that I prefer to have the very best in qualiIMG_1463[1]ty. Dark amber colored, sticky to the touch and it’s gotta have that unmistakable pungent terpene smell.

Pine lighter is found in dead or alive pine trees. It is generally found in the roots, trunk or stump and crotches where branches meet the trunks of trees. It is pine sap that has gathered and coagulated in those areas due to damage to that particular part of the tree. Within this sap is terpene. Terpene acts as a natural bug repellent and barrier to protect the tree.

Pine sap and the terpene which lies within is like “gold,” to a woodsman in the bush. When used properly it allows for fire in nearly any and all weather conditions. It is naturally waterproof due to the natural pine sap. It is highly combustible due to the natural terpene and has been used throughout history because of such attributes.bushcraft business 009

Now it is my experience that the more you process pine lighter down the less volatile it will be. This is caused be the natural terpene evaporating from within the pine sap itself. This will cause the pine sap to harden and oxidize. When a piece of pine lighter does this it will lighten in color. This does not mean it is not good. It will continue to light and burn but it will not have the same intense combustion as it did when first processed. Pine Lighter left unprocessed will be more combustible than Maya dust (pine lighter dust) or shavings.bushcraft business 008

For this reason I try to keep all my pine lighter wood unprocessed as much a possible until use.

Remember all pine lighter will be effective and burn as long as it has some amount of pine sap within it. It does not necessarily have to be soaked with sap to start a fire, it just may not be as effective and therefore not 4DB quality!

Watch my YouTube video on this interesting topic at:  https://youtu.be/SlATku-wo-g

~Chris

4 Directions Bushcraft