Hafting a Stone Ground Axe, Deep Woods Brush Shelter, Bow Drill Submerged in Water

Hafting a Stone Ground Axe, Deep Woods Brush Shelter, Bow Drill Submerged in Water

Thank you all for watching. In this video I haft the full groove stone ground axe head that I have been working on. I start with birch tar glue and cow raw hide. I use the plummet to flatten a piece of the hide and place it on the white tail deer antler to fill in the voids so hafting wouldimg_2890 be easier. I wrap cow raw hide through the groove on the axe head. This will fill voids and when it dries it secures the axe head as well. I then wrap the axe head and antler with artificial sinew. This must be as tight as I can possibly make it. Real sinew is recommended due to it’s natural strength and glue characteristics. I secure it with birch tare glue. I then wrap natural cordage white willow bark around it and I also secure that with birch tar glue. I repeatedly reheat the entire axe over the hot camp fire coals and press the birch tar glue into the bindings of the sinew and willow bark. This will make it like they are bonded together and stronger when it dries. The last step in hafting I wrap natural cordage Basswood inner bark (this was made off camera to save time) around the axe for more stability and to make it look a little better. I secure this with birch tar glue as well.img_2809
I had to wait a few days for the raw hide to dry and the birch tar to set. I then wanted to put it to the test and I did this by building a deep woods brush shelter. I chopped a tree using a beaver chew technique, I wanted the tree to still be attached to that it would create the header for my shelter. The axe held strong and performed well. I finished the shelter off with Japanese Honeysuckle branches which I also cut down with the axe. I finish the shelter off with a fern bed which made it very comfortable. I wanted a fire and started it with a soaking wet bow drill set that I submerged into water a couple of times. This bow drill set is Basswood and can be purchased on my website using this link img_2617http://4directionsbushcraft.com/product/bow-drill-friction-fire-kit/
This took two tries to accomplish a coal and my spindle was binding up due to the wood being wet. With a little patience I did pull it off on the second try and I was able to boil some water in my primitive clay cup that I made last year. This was a nice treat while I enjoyed the shade that my brush shelter provided.
The hafting process took a total of 4 days while the stone ground axe head took approximately 2 days. Hafting is an art all in itself and is usually done several times during an axes life time. It requires a lot of patience due to the processes that must be done to ensure strength, like birch tar and natural cordage.
This is how our ancestors would have completed a project like this. They used the same techniques but without some of the resources like the tin can and pliers.
Thank you and have fun out there. Please subscribe, like and share and we will see you on the next video.
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~ Chris

4DB

The Study of Primitive Skills

The Study of Primitive Skills

I am very interested in the unique skills of our ancestors and I love to revisit the methods they used in order to adapt to their environment. I stone-toolsstudy the Paleolithic and Neolithic Stone Age along with our Native American time periods to try and grasp their techniques and way of life. I am currently working on a series of YouTube videos that demonstrates a few of these ancient techniques.

Neolithic Ground Stone Axe

Ground Stone axe heads, natural cordage, hafting and friction fire methods that our ancestors used in their day to day life styles. I use only the resources and techniques that they would have used in order to replicate and experience their struggles to make life more comfortable. Be sure to to tune in and subscribe to our YouTube middle-stone-age-picchannel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUsld9DrfRRNVgZODfEKmgg so that you can also see a few of the methods our ancestors used. Our next video will cover the difficult process of hafting a stone ground axe head. Thank you.

~Chris

4DB

Full Groove Stone Ground Axe with Willow Bark Cordage

Full Groove Stone Ground Axe with Willow Bark Cordage

https://youtu.be/P86WocTyNxo

In this video I demonstrate the very long process of creating a full groove stone ground Neolithic (New Stone Age) axe head. During this video I work on two different axe head projects but the process is the same and consists of pecking the stone and grinding the stone. This particular project took about 12-16 hours just in forming the axe head itself.
I’m preparing to haft the axe so I create natural cordage with white willow bark to help with this. I processes the bark down then boil it in camp fire char coal and ash to make it even more pliable. This will help it not to break during the chopping with the axe.
I also create fire with a Yucca spindle and White Pine hearth board.
I roast and eat a Cattail root. I also eat a piece of steak for lunch with the dogs.
The only other process in recreating a Neolithic Stone Ground Axe is to haft the axe. I will demonstrate this in my next video so please stay tuned in.
I appreciate all of you that have come along with me in this journey back in time. This type of project allows us to see and experience the type of life style our ancestors had and how hard they had to work to produce tools and weapons.
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~ Chris

4DB

Couple New Videos Up at 4DB YT

We’ve been working hard on our videos but it’s more like fun because it is our passion to share our bushcraft and woodsman knowledge with everyone. Pleas check out our new videos up at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUsld9DrfRRNVgZODfEKmgg

Neolithic Ground Stone Axe
Neolithic Ground Stone Axe

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You can expect many more videos like the ones on our channel to come.

Thank you and have fun out there!

 

Emergency Gear Pack
Emergency Gear Pack

~Chris

 

4 Directions Bushcraft

New Primitive Video up on YouTube at 4DB

Check out our new video on YouTube, Neolithic Ground Stone Hand Axe.

In this video I make a Neolithic (New Stone Age) polished hand axe. These tools were made by the earliest humans to help them process foods, wood and construct more tools. This period of time was 10,200 BC and was the last part of the Stone Age when farming began. It ended when metal tools, such as Copper and Bronze, became widespread. Many Neolithic Stone tools were polished and ground down by another stone to be formed as I demonstrate in this video. By using this technique the tool becomes very durable and requires less maintenance than chipped or flaked stone. Typically the types of stone used are granite, basalt, rhyolite and other igneous and cryptocrystalline rocks. This is a piece of basalt stone. As you can see these tools were very effective for the time period.

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